“Next in line, please” could thwart sales opportunities

“Next in line, please” could thwart sales opportunities

“Next in line, please” could thwart sales opportunities

Shopper crossing sign

Image by turtlemom4bacon via Flickr

We were shopping in a store today and may have bought more if it weren’t for a salesperson turning our attention away from what we might have bought. HUH?

Yes, you heard right. We were on our way to the check out when we stopped at an end cap (a strategically merchandised area) and were watching a demo video (expensive add-on meant to hold our attention… which it did) when the cashier hollered out to us from behind her counter, “Are you ready to check out?”

We were so distracted by her call-out that we dutifully walked over immediately and checked out – completely forgetting our interest in the end cap merchandise.

Now I recognize that she “was just doing her job” as a cashier and letting us know she was available. But this was an end cap (prime real estate) with a built in video (pretty pricey merchandising) meant to get our attention – and she called us AWAY from it!

I am sure you know the moral to this story. She was not trained to be savvy to customer behavior. If she had, she would not have called us away from our interest in the carefully merchandised product and a potential purchase. To be even more proactive, she should have sent over a salesperson to increase our interest if she could not come over to us herself since we were so obviously interested. But since her primary function is as a cashier, she was doing exactly what she was trained to do –  to make sure customers are checked out efficiently. As a result, she also efficiently thwarted potential sales.

I am sure that this very well merchandised end cap included a video player specifically to promote where a salesperson could not be positioned. Yet all this extra effort is sabotaged because a cashier was only trained to check us out as quickly as possible.

It seems managers just assume that all staff would be conscious of their efforts to sell the most merchandise. But if you train individual staff members with a hyper-focus on their specific job description, sales will suffer.

Train your staff to crossover their particular job descriptions for improved customer service and higher volume sales! At the very least, let the cashiers come out from behind the counter!

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4 Responses to ““Next in line, please” could thwart sales opportunities”

  1. Jyppe A. Quidores

    Your experience is indeed a good example of how visual merchandising is more effective using multimedia and how its effectiveness can ruined by a staff. Keep posting and thanks for the link. 😀

    • @bizcommunicator

      Your welcome and thank you for commenting, Jyppe!
      I had noticed your post discussing all these wonderful merchandising methods and I realized it reinforced my point very well. I imagine some managers and store owners hope these displays should do all the work on their own…

  2. Jyppe A. Quidores

    Your experience is indeed a good example of how visual merchandising is more effective using multimedia and how its effectiveness can ruined by a staff. Keep posting and thanks for the link. 😀

    • @bizcommunicator

      Your welcome and thank you for commenting, Jyppe!
      I had noticed your post discussing all these wonderful merchandising methods and I realized it reinforced my point very well. I imagine some managers and store owners hope these displays should do all the work on their own…

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